Joel Blackstock

“From the very early stages of development, (HPM) worked with us as a team member, side by side, throughout the progression of the project. (HPM) surpassed our expectations and did an excellent job of assisting the Auburn University and our firm to ensure exceptional quality for the owner’s funding.”

Joel Blackstock
Williams Blackstock Architects




DELIVERING MRO FACILITIES WITH QUALITY, SPEED AND EFFICIENCY

DELIVERING MRO FACILITIES WITH QUALITY, SPEED AND EFFICIENCY

Through recent success working with global clients within the aviation industry, saving them time and money, HPM has positioned ourselves as trusted advisors in the industry. Building upon that success, Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) clients such as VT MAE, HAECO and WestWind Technologies have trusted us with facilities designed for the specific work they do within the aviation industry. Aviation is a broad field, and building an MRO facility is different from building an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) facility in a number of important ways.

Time is of the essence. The most significant difference in construction of MRO and OEM facilities is the timeframe. Efficient use of time is important with any project, of course, but for MRO companies, every day late represents money — and possibly even clients — lost. “These companies are making commitments to airlines around the world several months in advance,” said HPM Project Manager Andrew Betts. “The completion date of the project is hyper-critical, or else you’re looking at a significant operational impact on the owner.”

The building is simple. An OEM facility requires plenty of space, many systems and a high level of finish to turn a warehouse full of parts into a wide-body jet. MRO facilities, working on already-completed aircraft, don’t use the same type of equipment or need the same amount of space as manufacturing facilities. From the outside, an MRO facility usually looks like a simple aircraft hangar. But simple doesn’t necessarily mean easy.

The processes are complex. Most MRO companies don’t work on just one type of aircraft — one facility might serve passenger jets, freight jets, private jets and helicopters all in the same hangar. That means the building has to be large enough to fit the company’s biggest project, and the systems have to be ready to work on whatever aircraft rolls through the 40-foot-high door. “An MRO facility has to be as flexible as possible,” said James Adams, HPM’s Western Region Group Leader. “The equipment has to support any number of configurations, and that has to be worked in at the design phase.”

The stakeholders are numerous. As program managers, HPM has a responsibility to the facility’s owner. But that owner might have a responsibility to a lot of other stakeholders, from major clients to government entities. When a facility has to be up to code, up to the owner’s standards and up to the specifications of a global airline or the U.S. military, a good program manager is key to handling the communication and requirements to make that possible.

While it’s important to choose a program management firm experienced in aviation, it’s even more important to choose one experienced in your specific kind of aviation — all aviation facilities aren’t made the same. MRO companies need a partner that won’t just get them a quality building, but will do so quickly and efficiently—that’s where HPM comes in. Contact us today at 1.844.4HPM.LEADS to learn how we can partner with your company.